Teaching: Visual Merchandising BA Year 2 London College of Fashion

Teaching VM 2nd year students I done a presentation to introduce myself and my work as well as doing a presentation about Westfield to introduce the students to the Westfield project to the class, and prepare them for their visit to Westfield Shopping Centre. I spoke about my work and Westfields, I mention to the students that my work and the Westfield presentation was a guide to help the students with their visual research on their Westfield project which the end result will be an art ‘installation’ piece. I said that my experimental style combined with mixed media, to create my installations art. that I have transformed all different type of spaces into a custom built interactive environment, because  my students have to transform their given space at Westfields, into an interactive environment.  I told that they can draw inspiration from my work, as a guide for their Westfields installation project. They can link my work their project brief as our creative conceptual use of space in an imaginative way, creating an environment using installations art as a means to convey messages to our audience.

MY WORK PRESENTATION

     

WESTFIELD PRESENTATION

Students watching my presentation

Westfield Notes:

Westfield Stratford City is a shopping centre in Stratfordwhich opened on 13 September 2011. Part of a large multi-purpose development project called Stratford City, a city within a city. It is one of the largest metropolitan shopping centres in Europe.

Around 280 shops offering plenty of high street shops such as Primark, Forever 21, Topshop, Accessorize, Jigsaw, Oasis, New Look, Urban Outfitters, Quiz, H&M to name a few. As well as some luxury home and lifestyle brands. Also, you can relax and indulge in cuisine from all over the world, from Mexican to Caribbean with over 70 restaurants.

In addition to its vast amount of shops and restaurants, you’ll find a dazzling array of leisure facilities. The Vue Cinema all-digital 17-screen, is one of the largest and most innovative in Europe. You can also experience the luxury bowling at All Star Lanes, or even try your luck at the 24-hour Aspers Casino, which is one of the biggest in the UK.

Westfield Stratford City is close to the Queen Elizabeth Park, home to West ham United Football Club and 560 acres of parklands that will also become the culture and education hub which LCF, UCL, Victoria and Albert Museum with Smithsonian institution and Sadler’s Wells Theatre come together to form a new culture creative hub on the Queen Elizabeth park. Hopefully this will be opportunitiesfor local residents and their community to utilise this space. East Village, is that was the former Olympic Village that home to the athletes during the Olympics in 2012.

Westfield Stratford City is part of London borough of Newham. According to the local council by 2025 it is estimated that over £22 billion will have been invested in the area, creating more than 35,000 new homes and 100,000 new jobs.The London borough of Newham, is the 2nd poorest and most deprived borough in London and the country. Newham has one of the youngest and most diverse populations in theUK boroughs. With over 200 languages and dialects.

Newham population characteristics

  • The median age is 30.8 years (mid-2015)
  • 52.3% of the population are male and 47.7% female (mid-2015)
  • 25.2% (83,800) of the population are under 18 years, 67.8% (225,600) are aged 18 to 64 years and 7% (23,400) are aged 65 years and older (mid-2015)
  • By 2021 Newham’s population is projected to be over 367,900 (SNPP).
  • Ethnic or cultural background of residents: 46.5% Asian/Asian British, 26.5% White, 18.1% Black/Black British, 4.9% mixed/multiple ethnic group and 4.0% any other ethnic group.These figures are based on the mid-year 2017 GLA ethnic group projection.**
  • 40% of residents are Christian, 32% Muslim, 8.8% Hindu, 2.1% Sikh, 1.2% part of another religious group, 9.5% were not religious and 6.4% did not state their religion (2011).
  • Religion in Newham as of 2011.
  • Christianity(40%)
  • Islam(32%)
  • Irreligion(9.3%)
  • Hindu(8.8%)
  • Sikh(2.1%)
  • Buddhist(0.8%)
  • Jewish(0.1%)
  • Other (6.9%)

Westfield Stratford City isn’t the only reason to visit this exciting area. You’ll find a wealth of sporting, cultural and dining attractions nearby too.

  • The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. …
  • Stratford Cultural Quarter. …
  • All Saints West Ham. …
  • The Royal Docks. …
  • Emirates Airline.Westfield Stratford City has been reported to be the first large-scale use of Pavegen floor tilesto harness kinetic energy

Stratford Regional and Stratford International stations. It is promoted as contributing significantly to the local economy, with the creation of up to 10,000 permanent jobs including 2,001 going to local people.[ However, there are counter-reports of significant harm to other local businesses due to the preponderance of chain stores.Total retail floor area of 1,905,542 square feet (177,030.6 m2),

 

Taking VM My Students to see the Selfridges ExhibitionThe Flipside.  To be inspired for their Westfield project (images)

VM Students waiting in the cue.

 

This Exhibition  was very interesting for the students to visit it helped them to see various way of creating and displays.

     

Images inside the exhibition

 

 

Visit to the Islington Design Centre for the Exhibition Event Display

 

 

Self-Initiative Project: Presentation

Self-Initiative Project

Visible Black

Black female artists: 101 must see Black Artists: Hardback, E-Books, Webpage blog, website, exhibition. Planned.

I want to use this self-initiative project as a starting point for my PHD book base, to equip libraries in our universities with books about black female artists, and change the understanding of the world of art, breaking down barriers, and invisibility and giving voice to black female artist a marginalised group who have so much to say. I want black female artist to be recognise in the mainstream art, so that everyone can access their arts. Art should not be centred just around European art and culture, Students of today are more diverse want to study art that represent and inspire and speak to them emotionally, that will encourage them to learn to create great work of art. our universities libraries must be decolonized to accommodate a more diverse community. Not everyone wants to read about European artist, that are mainly old white men, universities are so diverse, and student wants books with artists that they can identified with while others want to expand their knowledge of artists from different cultures. Every culture uses their art to express their identity and they all have something to say. And their own reasons for creating their work of art.

Image by Lorraine Williams

This piece was created to open a space in people’s mind where they can have a moment to understand what we are trying to do as black women artist to be visible. I have used colours for emotions and layers for expressive power and manipulation to convey a message of strength and visibility by whatever means necessary, and manifest feeling in different ways.

 

Image taken from Black British Female Artist Collective

Phoebe Boswell, The Matter of Memory

 

Claudette Johnson courtesy the Artist/Hollybush Gardens. Photos: Andy Keate

 

 

 

Teaching and Learning Unit: Reading Journal:

Student Evaluations of Teaching as ‘Fact-Totems’: The Case of the UK National Student Survey

by Duna Sabri
King”s College, London

Managers use survey results to ‘identify potential problems in the student experience, and to act on them quickly’ (Ramsden et al. 2010: 3). For those who teach, in particular, but also for some who manage, publication of the NSS results can occasion a series of performative episodes that close down the possibilities for critical engagement with student feedback as the NSS is cast as an indisputable expression of ‘the student experience’ and critique is interpreted as ‘blaming the student’.  

The ‘things’ institutions ‘can do’ with NSS data include: analysis of quantitative ratings and students ‘open comments’, and making records at multiple levels (university, school, department, course etc) that record results, response, action, comparison with past years, and with other universities and comparable courses. These records and associated  innumerable rankings add layers of meaning and emotion to the way that staff members experience the NSS. Sometimes highly charged discussions take place about culpability or credit, conflicting interpretations, and perceptions of validity. All of this can take place independently of any technical understanding of the statistics (de Santos 2009). I find this quote by de Santos interesting because the universities use the NSS to help them identified the different cultural groups and economic issues, and if they are meeting the students needs. and if students are satisfied with their courses and the quality of teaching they provide.  However, looking at it from the perspective of a Bame students as they are more likely to highlight their experiences to facts that they are dissatisfied the quality of teaching and feedback they receive as well as support and interaction from their tutors . Students you are always encouraged to fill in the NSS, this gives the students the opportunity to draw attention to their negative experiences, hoping this might have some form of impact on the courses especially if expectations are not being met by the universities. therefore, some courses might suffer after the NSS has gathered the information, this could mean changes to the structure some of courses, and also rankings may rise or fall depending their results.

 

Reflections on Aoun’s (2017) consequences for the advancement of technology

A LEARNING MODEL FOR THE FUTURE

Literacy gives us the power to network with the ideas and information produced by other people> at any distance of time or space. Written language allows us to communicate ideas, mathematics allows us to communicate about quantities and dimensions, and scientific literacy allows us to communicate about the natural world. In a digital milieu, human beings require more complex literacies that enable us to do more than simply transmit con­cepts ‘between human minds. Humanics’ three new literacies technological, data, and human-enable us to network with both other people and machines. Even more so, they empower us to use the digital world to its fullest potential.

Technological Literacy

The first of these new literacies is technological literacy-knowledge of mathematics, coding, and basic engineering principles. Today’s “digital natives” have grown up immersed in digital technologies and possess the technical aptitude to utilize the powers of their devices fully. But although they know which apps to use or which websites to visit, they do not necessarily understand the work­ings behind the touchscreen. People need technological literacy if they are to understand machines’ mechanics and uses. In much the same way as factory workers a hundred years ago needed to understand the basic structures of engines, we need to understand the elemental principles behind our devices. This empowers us to deploy software and hardware to their fullest utility, maximizing our powers to achieve and create.

I found this is very interesting as I am experimental artist/ animator and associate lecturer,  working with technology its a tool that is a vital part of my creative  craft. I’m fascinated by what future of technologies have to offer design and education,  for my own practice I’m working on a project integrates the use of virtual reality technology, motion decking devices for audience interaction and to stimulate the users senses at the same time. technology literacy plays a big role in universities and in our everyday lives, knowledge of technology it is very important as it helps us to function effectively and communicate across the globe from our classrooms or around us in our daily lives. Having huge storage Computers are used to help students research and complete assignments as they allow them to access information quickly, the collaborate between human and technology to create positive change around us. It is crucial  that we all learn how to use and  have some understanding of technology, students and teachers depend on  technology to learn about their different subjects and interact with other tutors and peers. using technology enables them to create blogs, audio and videos, using the different software products and creating apps. For these reasons I feel that is  why it is  essential that we are educated to become technology literacy, as this type skills are important to create diverse learning experience in our universities and work place. As Joseph Aoun  argues for the need for better and continuous education to keep up with changing technology. and artificial intelligence & future of education.

 

Whitehead, A.N. 1929. Universities and their Function. In The Aims of Education and other essays. The Free Press. pp91-101. (pdf attached)

“Teachers should be alive with thoughts”

This brings us to the participants in this adventure, to you the students and to us the teachers, those who impart knowledge, and to Whitehead’s plea that “teachers should be alive with thoughts.” It is not enough to ask students to take knowledge and use it. We teachers are responsible to impart information in a way that encourages you students to turn what could be (in other hands and circumstances) “inert knowledge” into active, vibrant, engaged tools. It is this area, teachers, that I turn to now and that I am certain will concern every one of you in the coming years. Here at the University of Chicago, you will find yourself engaging with many teachers. They will teach you formally in the seminar room, laboratory, and lecture hall, and informally in their offices, your dorms, in coffee shops, and perhaps in their homes. They will teach deliberately and accidentally, by lesson plan and by example. They will hold ranks and titles within the University that mean little to you: named professors, lecturers, visiting scholars. Some of them will be Nobel laureates; others will have just defended their dissertations and stepped across the line from student to professor. They will have published scholarly books, given papers at international conferences, advised governments, and composed concertos. They will have mapped the genome, excavated dinosaur bones, and exhibited at major international museums. Some will have been at the University for decades and won teaching awards and recognition, others will be facing a class for the first time. What they will all have in common is that every one of them will have an effect upon you, whether they intend to or not. This effect might manifest itself immediately, of course. But it might also creep up on you slowly. I’d like to tell you something about how we select these people as you begin your studies.

 

Ian Munday 23/2/2018

 

The Inclusive Teaching Unit uses, as one of its key theories, critical pedagogy. In preparation for the start of the course we would like you to watch the following 14 minute film on Critical Pedagogy from the Friere Project:

What are the central concerns of critical pedagogy?

The dominant beliefs of critical pedagogy, in particular as it is outline by Paulo Freire, is how the classrooms is assembled in which teachers and students learn together. Critical pedagogy allows the students to speak with greater confidence about knowledge they already possess.

Wink sum up, why does critical pedagogy matter? Kids matter—that’s why. Our future matters—that’s why. It is as simple as that. It also is something we all know. This is serious business we are talking about. Students and teachers are hurting. We in education are a mirror of society. Critical pedagogy challenges our long-held assumptions and leads us to ask new questions, and the questions we ask will determine the answers we get. Critical pedagogy gives voice to the voice- less; gives power to the powerless. Change is often difficult, and critical pedagogy is all about change from coercive to collaborative; from transmission to transformative; from inert to catalytic; from passive to active. Critical pedagogy leads us to advocacy and activism on behalf of those who are the most vulnerable in classrooms and in society Wink, 2005, p. 165.

In what ways does critical pedagogy relate to UK Higher Education?

Students need the freedom and encouragement to determine and discover who they are and to understand that the system shouldn’t define them – but rather give them the skills, knowledge and beliefs to understand that they can set the agenda. Educators must be prepared to embrace a radical pedagogy and believe that each school should be one of freedom that provokes students to fight against the corridors of power and enforce equality for themselves and others.

How does critical pedagogy relate to your own practice?

Wink sum up, why does critical pedagogy matter? Kids matter—that’s why. Our future matters—that’s why. It is as simple as that. It also is something we all know. This is serious business we are talking about. Students and teachers are hurting. We in education are a mirror of society. Critical pedagogy challenges our long-held assumptions and leads us to ask new questions, and the questions we ask will determine the answers we get. Critical pedagogy gives voice to the voice- less; gives power to the powerless. Change is often difficult, and critical pedagogy is all about change from coercive to collaborative; from transmission to transformative; from inert to catalytic; from passive to active. Critical pedagogy leads us to advocacy and activism on behalf of those who are the most vulnerable in classrooms and in society Wink, 2005, p. 165.

In what ways does critical pedagogy relate to UK Higher Education?

Students need the freedom and encouragement to determine and discover who they are and to understand that the system shouldn’t define them – but rather give them the skills, knowledge and beliefs to understand that they can set the agenda. Lectures must be prepared to embrace a radical pedagogy and believe that each lesson should be one of freedom that provokes students to fight against the dominance of power and enforce equality for themselves and others.